U.S. Department of Justice, Office Of Justice Programs, Innovation - Partnerships - Safer Neighborhoods
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), Serving Children, Families, and Communities
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   Child Abduction: Resources for Victims and Families

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has developed several publications to support child abduction victims and their families.

AMBER Alert logoAMBER Alert Joins Twitter (February 2014), an article from OJJDP’s News @ a Glance, highlights the availability of an AMBER Alert Twitter account, which will make it easier for the Alerts to reach followers.
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cover of Guide for  Implementing or Enhancing an Endangered Missing AdvisoryGuide for Implementing or Enhancing an Endangered Missing Advisory (March 2011) provides AMBER Alert coordinators, law enforcement, and public safety professionals with an effective and efficient way to implement an Endangered Missing Advisory (EMA) plan.
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Cover: Crime of Family Abduction: A Child's and Parent's Perspective

Crime of Family Abduction: A Child's and Parent's Perspective (May 2010) dispels the prevailing misconceptions surrounding family abduction by providing a firsthand account of the psychological trauma and physical dangers often faced by children who are abducted by family members. Includes strategies to help parents searching for their children cope with the aftermath of the abduction.
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Spanish Abstract | Spanish PDF

Cover: You're Not Alone: The Journey From Abduction to Empowerment You're Not Alone: The Journey From Abduction to Empowerment (May 2008) presents the stories of several child abduction survivors and how they have grown and developed since their traumatic experiences. Written by the survivors themselves, the publication provides information to help other child abduction survivors cope with their own experiences and begin their journeys towards a better future.
Abstract | PDF | order button
Spanish Abstract | Spanish PDF | order button

Cover: What About Me? Coping With the Abduction of a Brother or SisterWhat About Me? Coping With the Abduction of a Brother or Sister (May 2007), written by siblings of children who have been abducted, provides information to help and support children of all ages when their brother or sister is kidnapped.
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Spanish Abstract | Spanish PDF | order button

Cover: When Your Child Is Missing: A Family Survival GuideWhen Your Child Is Missing: A Family Survival Guide (May 2010) provides parents with the most current information on, and helpful insights into, what families should do when a child is missing. Contains advice concerning what to expect when a child is missing, what needs to be done, and where to go for help.
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Spanish Abstract | Spanish PDF

Resources for Parents and Families of Missing or Abducted Children

law enforceLocal Law Enforcement. If your child is missing, immediately call your local law enforcement agency to make a report. Be prepared to give the law enforcement agency information about your child, including his or her name, date of birth, height, weight, and any other unique identifiers such as eyeglasses and braces. Tell them when you noticed that your child was missing and what clothing he or she was wearing. Request that your child's name and identifying information be immediately entered into the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File.

National Center for Missing & Exploited Children logo

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) was established in 1984 to help prevent child abduction and sexual exploitation, find missing children, and assist victims and their families. To access their resources, visit their Web site at www.missingkids.com or call NCMEC at 800–THE–LOST (800–843–5678).

Association of Missing and Exploited Children's Organizations logoThe Association of Missing and Exploited Children's Organizations (AMECO) is a membership organization of nonprofit local agencies in the United States and Canada that provide services to the families of missing children. They can help with resource referrals as well as advocacy, poster and flier development and dissemination, and aid to local law enforcement. Visit their Web site at www.amecoinc.org or call them at 877–263–2620.

Team H.O.P.E. (Help Offering Parents Empowerment) is a parent mentoring and support program for families of missing children. Made up of parent volunteers, Team H.O.P.E. provides mentoring services, counseling, and emotional support for both parents and other family members. Volunteers can be reached at 866–305–HOPE (4673). Visit their Web site at www.missingkids.com/TeamHOPE.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): Child ID App
The FBI’s Child ID App is a free tool that provides a convenient place to electronically store photos and vital information about your children so that it is immediately accessible if you need it.

For More Information

subscribe to Juvjust iconNews and information about OJJDP are also available by subscribing to the Office's JUVJUST listserv and the bimonthly online newsletter OJJDP News @ a Glance.

NCJRS bannerAdditional information about the topic of child protection and other juvenile justice issues is available from the Office of Justice Programs' National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS). Visit the NCJRS Web site to learn more.

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