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Juvenile Population Characteristics
Juvenile Population
Q: How many juveniles are there in the United States population?
A: In 2012, 73.9 million Americans - about 1 in 4 - were under age 18.

Persons under age 18, 2012-2060

Year Population 0-17
(in millions)
2012 72.357
2013 72.674
2014 72.994
2015 73.302
2016 73.626
2017 73.982
2018 74.291
2019 74.545
2020 74.702
2021 74.907
2022 75.217
2023 75.622
2024 76.136
2025 76.718
2026 77.366
2027 78.106
2028 78.880
2029 79.644
2030 80.396
2031 81.027
2032 81.685
2033 82.343
2034 82.979
2035 83.612
2036 84.242
2037 84.866
2038 85.480
2039 86.081
2040 86.669
2041 87.246
2042 87.815
2043 88.383
2044 88.953
2045 89.531
2046 90.119
2047 90.722
2048 91.340
2049 91.975
2050 92.628
2051 93.298
2052 93.986
2053 94.692
2054 95.415
2055 96.153
2056 96.906
2057 97.669
2058 98.443
2059 99.222
2060 100.006

[ Graph version ]  [ Excel file ]

  • The juvenile population is expected to grow at a faster rate than the adult population in the coming decades. Based on the latest population projections from the U.S. Census Bureau, between 2015 and 2025, the population of persons under age 18 is expected to increase 5%. In contrast, the population of persons ages 18 through 24 will decline 3%, persons ages 25 to 64 will increase 3%. Only the population of those ages 65 and older is expected to increase more than the youth population (36%) by 2025.
  • The population of juvenile minorities will experience the most growth between 2015 and 2025. The number of black, non-Hispanic juveniles is expected to increase about 5%, American Indian/Alaskan Native, non-Hispanic juveniles 3%, Asian, non-Hispanic juveniles 17%, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islanders non-Hispanic juveniles 15%, while white, non-Hispanic juveniles will decline 4%. Juveniles of Hispanic ethnicity are expected to increase 17% by the middle of the next decade, and the number of multi-racial youth is expected to grow nearly 30% during this period.
  • By 2025, racial-ethnic minorities will account for 53% of the youth population under age 18, and 60% by year 2045.

Internet citation: OJJDP Statistical Briefing Book. Online. Available: http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/population/qa01101.asp?qaDate=2012. Released on December 17, 2012.

Data Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census. "Projected Population by Single Year of Age (0-99, 100+), Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: July 1, 2012 to July 1, 2060." Released December 12, 2012. Web-based data files available at: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/data/national/2012/downloadablefiles.html. Retrieved December 13, 2012.

 

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