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Juveniled Justice System Structure & Process
Organization & Administration of Delinquency Services
Q: What are the most commonly used residential placement options for committed youth?
A: Based on data from the 2011 Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement (CJRP), on October 26, 2011 public long-term secure facilities, also referred to as training schools, were the most commonly used residential placement option for committed youth.

Public and Private Placement Options, 2011

State of facility Youth
Committed
to Facilities
                                            Public                                                                       Private
Facilities
All Public
Facilities
Long-Term
Secure
Facility
Ranch/
Wilderness
Camp
Halfway
House or
Group Home
Other*

U.S. Total 41,934 60% 35% 3% 10% 11% 40%

Alabama 726 47  35  0  3  9  53 
Alaska 123 70  70  0  0  0  30 
Arizona 912 59  42  0  0  17  41 

Arkansas 537 20  0  0  3  18  80 
California 5,676 83  29  20  13  22  17 
Colorado 948 48  41  0  3  5  52 

Connecticut 141 89  89  0  0  0  11 
Delaware 78 100  85  0  15  0  0 
District of Columbia 81 70  58  0  8  5  30 

Florida 3,021 11  2  0  3  6  89 
Georgia 909 88  58  0  1  29  12 
Hawaii 66 95  95  0  0  0  5 

Idaho 324 83  49  0  6  28  17 
Illinois 1,410 89  83  0  1  4  11 
Indiana 1,371 60  34  0  4  21  40 

Iowa 753 18  18  0  0  0  82 
Kansas 558 70  59  7  0  4  30 
Kentucky 513 83  6  0  54  22  17 

Louisiana 624 70  59  0  4  6  30 
Maine 138 100  100  0  0  0  0 
Maryland 432 55  0  0  53  2  45 

Massachusetts 399 23  10  0  8  5  78 
Michigan 1,446 29  13  0  7  9  71 
Minnesota 660 53  29  4  7  14  47 

Mississippi 138 100  48  0  0  52  0 
Missouri 885 95  3  0  89  3  5 
Montana 111 77  70  0  6  1  23 

Nebraska 516 53  45  0  0  7  47 
Nevada 636 67  38  24  2  3  33 
New Hampshire 87 55  55  0  0  0  45 

New Jersey 612 96  59  0  33  3  4 
New Mexico 351 90  81  0  9  0  10 
New York 1,689 38  18  0  18  1  63 

North Carolina 402 81  75  0  3  3  19 
North Dakota 135 43  43  0  0  0  57 
Ohio 1,545 90  52  0  19  19  10 

Oklahoma 330 73  43  5  21  3  27 
Oregon 927 74  68  0  0  6  26 
Pennsylvania 3,225 15  4  1  8  1  85 

Rhode Island 96 0  0  0  0  0  100 
South Carolina 426 31  31  0  0  0  69 
South Dakota 342 44  27  0  12  5  56 

Tennessee 588 71  68  0  3  1  29 
Texas 3,054 83  55  0  13  15  17 
Utah 594 59  36  0  0  23  41 

Vermont 21 77  77  0  0  0  23 
Virginia 1,170 95  58  0  7  30  5 
Washington 783 97  59  0  12  26  3 

West Virginia 498 34  29  0  4  1  66 
Wisconsin 687 54  46  0  1  8  46 
Wyoming 246 40  40  0  0  0  60 

Notes: To preserve the privacy of the juvenile residents, state level cell counts have been rounded to the nearest multiple of three. Percentages are based on unrounded counts.
*Includes detention centers, shelter facilities, reception/diagnostic centers, and boot camps.
"State of Facility" refers to where the juvenile is being held. Data reported in this table varies slightly from data presented in "Easy Access to the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement" because state of offense is used there.

  • The Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement (CJRP), which is conducted biennially, asks all juvenile residential facilities in the U.S. to describe each youth younger than 21 accused or adjudicated of one or more delinquency or status offenses and assigned a bed in the facility on a specific day. The census does not include federal facilities or those exclusively for drug or mental health treatment or for abused/neglected youth.
  • The CJRP provides one-day population counts of juvenile offenders in juvenile residential placement facilities. Such one-day counts provide a picture of the standing population in facilities. One-day counts are substantially different from annual admission and release data, which provide a measure of facility population flow.
  • Public facilities are operated by a local or state government agency. Private facilities are operated by a third party that has a contract with a local or state government agency. In most states, private facilities must be licensed by a state agency.
  • Most youth adjudicated delinquent and status offenders are committed to public facilities (60%).
  • Long-term secure facilities/training schools are reported in 47 states and the District of Columbia and are the most frequently used public placement option.
  • States vary in the proportion of juveniles committed to private facilities - ranging from 0% to 100%.
  • In three states (Delaware, Maine, Mississippi), there were no private facilities that reported holding any youth adjudicated delinquent or status offenders on the Census reference date.
  • To access CJRP data, please visit Easy Access to the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement.

Internet citation: OJJDP Statistical Briefing Book. Online. Available: http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/structure_process/qa04208.asp?qaDate=2011. Released on April 24, 2014.

Developed for the State Training and Technical Assistance Center by the National Center for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ), with funding from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The following NCJJ staff contributed to this state profile: Sarah Hockenberry and Teri Deal.

 

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